Reality Check: What if women hadn’t been allowed to vote? – BBC News

The gender gap in voting is fairly small. Other demographic factors have a far bigger impact on people’s likelihood to vote for each party.
In the past, social class was a dominant factor. Middle-class people were more likely to vote Conservative and working-class people were more likely to vote Labour.
Recently that’s changed. In 2017, age and education were far more important. Young voters and voters with degrees were more likely to back Labour. Older voters and those with fewer qualifications were more likely to back the Conservatives.
But how do the sexes differ when it comes to elections?
If we look back over time the gender gap in voting has changed.
The British Election Study has data going back to the 1964 general election. In the 1960s and 1970s it found that women were more likely than men to vote Conservative and less likely to vote Labour. It’s not easy to find a definitive explanation.

via Reality Check: What if women hadn’t been allowed to vote? – BBC News

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100 Women: The female protesters against giving women the vote – BBC News

Historian Kathy Atherton says people nowadays can find it “surprising” that women were involved in an anti-suffrage movement, but that it’s important to “put yourself in their shoes”.
“There would have been a general acceptance that women were intellectually inferior and emotional – and women would have believed that as well as men – so they didn’t have the capacity to make political judgements,” she says.
“It’s a really hierarchical society and the white male is at the top of the heap.
“There’s a fear that you’re upsetting the natural order of things, even going so far as thinking the colonies would be affected if they felt that Britain was being ruled by women.”

via 100 Women: The female protesters against giving women the vote – BBC News

How Technology Ends Inequality – Entrepreneur First – Medium

There are many good points in this piece, some of them positive, some negative…

240,000,000 Indians use Facebook.
And while Mark Zuckerberg’s bank account contains 10,000,000 times more money than the average Indian’s, his Facebook account works more or less identically.
Quick and cheap distribution goes both ways — it creates financial inequality and experience equality. You can’t pay for a better Facebook experience.

via How Technology Ends Inequality – Entrepreneur First – Medium