‘Shocking’ level of sexual harassment at music festivals – BBC News

Nearly half of female festival goers (43%) under 40 say they have faced unwanted sexual behaviour at a music festival, new survey suggests.
Overall, 22% of all festival goers have faced assault or harassment, rising to 30% of women overall.
The most common forms were unwelcome and forceful dancing and verbal sexualised harassment.
YouGov surveyed 1,188 festival goers. The poll also suggested only 2% of such incidents were reported to police.
Earlier this year, separate data released in the Crime Survey for England and Wales in February showed more than 80% of victims of sexual assault did not report it to police.

via ‘Shocking’ level of sexual harassment at music festivals – BBC News

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Pittsburgh Sex Workers Are Being Charged With Carrying Condoms, or, ‘Instruments of Crime’–Raising the Question of Who Is at Risk

When asked to comment on the criminalization of condoms, a representative from the Allegheny County District Attorney’s office told Jezebel that the “premise that condoms have been criminalized is not an accurate statement.” He sent a letter from District Attorney Stephen Zappala, clarifying that the county is not criminalizing condoms across the board, but only classifying them as “instruments of crime” while there is a “nexus between condoms, phones, computers, etc., and the investigation of either trafficking or promotion of prostitution.” While Zappala also acknowledges that HIV is a serious public health risk, he seems to find that the ends justify the means. “If any police agency investigating such a crime [as human trafficking], believes that the possibility of exploitation exists, and did not adequately investigate such matters, they would not be doing their job,” he writes.

via Pittsburgh Sex Workers Are Being Charged With Carrying Condoms, or, ‘Instruments of Crime’–Raising the Question of Who Is at Risk

What Is Sexual Harassment? A Glossary of the #MeToo Movement | Glamour

Either way, the #MeToo era has given these training sessions an added urgency, especially when it comes to a full understanding of the movement’s key terms (and how to use them correctly). While the fact that we’re having more transparent, nuanced conversations about assault and abuses of power than ever before in history is inarguably a good thing, it’s also a dialogue that will ultimately prove more productive if we—men and women alike—are all on the same page about what we’re actually talking about. If our shared goal is more open and consistent conversation about #MeToo and all it entails, it’s crucial to get on the same page with terminology.

via What Is Sexual Harassment? A Glossary of the #MeToo Movement | Glamour

Chloe Dykstra details emotionally and sexually abusive relationship with nerd-culture mogul

Dykstra takes care to not explicitly name names in her post, but she does give some big hints, such as “I watched and supported him as he grew from a mildly successful podcaster to a powerhouse CEO of his own company” and saying that the unnamed ex “pressured [me] to take an on-camera job at his company I didn’t want.” She adds, “When cameras were on us? He was a prince. Turn them off, he was a nightmare.” During this time, she writes, her existing struggle with anorexia got worse, and:

via Chloe Dykstra details emotionally and sexually abusive relationship with nerd-culture mogul

Damning New Report Lays Out Science’s Sexual Harassment Problem

Among the hard lessons reaffirmed was just how pervasive harassment is. A recent survey of undergraduate and graduate students attending the University of Texas system, for instance, found that 20 percent of female science students, more than 25 percent of female engineering students, and 40 percent of female medical students had recently encountered harassment. Another study cited by the report estimated that 58 percent of women faculty and staff across all fields of academia have experienced harassment, a percentage second only to the United States military.

via Damning New Report Lays Out Science’s Sexual Harassment Problem

‘Upskirting’ will become a criminal offense in the UK (updated)

It will soon be a criminal offense in the UK to point a camera up a woman’s skirt and take a photo (an act called “upskirting”), with offenders facing up to two years in jail. It’s hard to believe, but there’s no specific law on the books, so police have had trouble prosecuting the creeps that do it. The new legislation will be largely through the efforts of victim Gina Martin. She was upskirted at a music festival in London, and despite having photographic evidence, police said they were unable to act because the photos weren’t considered graphic.

Afterwards, Martin started a petition that gained 104,000 signatures, including nearly 50,000 in the UK. That eventually caught the attention of Justice Secretary David Lidington, who got the ball rolling on the new legislation. The law will receive a second reading in the House of Commons today, after which it will specifically be illegal to “take a picture under a person’s clothing without them knowing, with the intention of viewing their genitals or buttocks,” according to the government.

via ‘Upskirting’ will become a criminal offense in the UK (updated)

Rose-Colored Glasses: A Confession. – Chloe Dykstra – Medium

In my early twenties, I was a vibrant, goofy kid who loved video games, Doctor Who, dressing up in cosplay with my friends, and karaoke nights. One day, I met someone at a convention and ended up falling for a man almost 20 years my senior. It wasn’t the first time I’d found myself in a relationship with an older man; I’ve always joked about my daddy issues, and thought that with age came stability and wisdom. Welp.
Our relationship started out poorly. Within 2 weeks, rules were quickly established. Some of these included:

via Rose-Colored Glasses: A Confession. – Chloe Dykstra – Medium

Chloe Dykstra, Ex of Chris Hardwick, Describes Disturbing Abuse by ‘Successful Podcaster’ Ex Boyfriend

n a gut-wrenching essay on Medium, actor Chloe Dykstra describes a years-long emotionally abusive relationship with a man 20 years her senior, who she supported as he went from “a mildly successful podcaster to a powerhouse CEO of his own company.” Though she never mentions him by name in her piece, many are speculating that the man in question is Nerdist founder and host of @midnight and Talking Dead, Chris Hardwick.

In the essay, titled “Rose-Colored Glasses: A Confession,” Dykstra says that her relationship, which began after meeting her ex at a convention, became immediately controlling, with her partner forbidding that she go out at night without him, drink alcohol (he is sober), or have male friends.

via Chloe Dykstra, Ex of Chris Hardwick, Describes Disturbing Abuse by ‘Successful Podcaster’ Ex Boyfriend

May ‘disappointed’ at upskirting law block – BBC News

Theresa May says she is “disappointed” an attempt to make upskirting a criminal offence in England and Wales did not progress through Parliament after one of her own MPs blocked it.
Conservatives have criticised Sir Christopher Chope for objecting to the private member’s bill.
If passed, it could see someone who has secretly taken a photo under a victim’s skirt face up to two years in prison.
The PM said she wanted to see it pass soon “with government support”.
Minister for Women, Victoria Atkins, said the government will allocate time for the bill in Parliament to ensure it does not get pushed down the list of private members’ bills, which would mean it could some time to return to the Commons.

via May ‘disappointed’ at upskirting law block – BBC News

Department of Education to Investigate USC’s Handling of Misconduct Allegations Against Gynecologist

The Department of Education has launched an investigation into the University of Southern California’s handling of sexual misconduct allegations against a longtime staff gynecologist. The investigation is guided by Title IX, the federal civil rights law against sex discrimination.

For years, George Tyndall, who worked in the university’s student health clinic, was accused of photographing students’ genitals and making sexual comments during exams, but he was allowed to continue practicing. Tyndall resigned last year—with a payout—after a university investigation found that his behavior during pelvic exams ran counter to accepted medical practice. But USC failed to notify his former patients of the findings or report him to the Medical Board of California—until, that is, the Los Angeles Times began reporting on the case.

via Department of Education to Investigate USC’s Handling of Misconduct Allegations Against Gynecologist