Women Get Quietly Photoshopped In to Photo of Exclusively Male Tech CEOs

Recently GQ ran a story about a group of major tech players, including Jeff Bezos and company executives from LinkedIn and Dropbox, who met up in an Italian village to hang out with designer Brunello Cucinelli, for some reason. But Buzzfeed reporter Ryan Mac noticed something peculiar about one of the photos used in the article. Mainly, he thought the only two women in the photo, CEO of solar power company Sunrun Lynn Jurich and CEO of Peek.com Ruzwana Bashir, had been Photoshopped in.

via Women Get Quietly Photoshopped In to Photo of Exclusively Male Tech CEOs

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United Kingdom Bans Sexist Ads

In the U.K., advertisers will no longer ask women if they are “beach body ready,” and no more will men appear perplexed by basic tasks like doing the laundry, preparing dinner, or changing diapers. That’s because the country’s Advertising Standards Authority has banned sexist messaging in commercials, eliminating ads that portray men as being clumsy when performing household tasks, ads that suggest a particular physical ideal leads to success, and ads that imply women are responsible for household tasks, the New York Times reports,

The regulations, announced in December, are now fully in effect. The ASA will enforce the rule by reviewing ads on a case-by-case basis, but offered examples of scenarios that are “likely to be problematic,” such as:

via United Kingdom Bans Sexist Ads

University of Alabama Set to Return $26.5 Million to Pro-Choice Donor

The University of Alabama’s board of trustees, which includes Gov. Kay Ivey, is probably going to refund the money of a major donor who’s been outspoken in his criticism of Alabama’s cruel and potentially deadly abortion ban.

Last week, Hugh F. Culverhouse Jr, a person wealthy enough to give tens of millions of dollars to a university he didn’t even attend, called for a boycott of the law school the university renamed in his honor after his September 2018 donation, according to the AP:

via University of Alabama Set to Return $26.5 Million to Pro-Choice Donor

How advancing women’s equality can add $12 trillion to global growth | McKinsey

Gender inequality is not only a pressing moral and social issue but also a critical economic challenge. If women—who account for half the world’s working-age population—do not achieve their full economic potential, the global economy will suffer. While all types of inequality have economic consequences, in McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) report, The power of parity: How advancing women’s equality can add $12 trillion to global growth, we focus on the economic implications of lack of parity between men and women.

via How advancing women’s equality can add $12 trillion to global growth | McKinsey

What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages: Jobs lost, jobs gained | McKinsey

The technology-driven world in which we live is a world filled with promise but also challenges. Cars that drive themselves, machines that read X-rays, and algorithms that respond to customer-service inquiries are all manifestations of powerful new forms of automation. Yet even as these technologies increase productivity and improve our lives, their use will substitute for some work activities humans currently perform—a development that has sparked much public concern.

via What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages: Jobs lost, jobs gained | McKinsey

Britain risks heading to US levels of inequality, warns top economist | Inequality | The Guardian

Rising inequality in Britain risks putting the country on the same path as the US to become one of the most unequal nations on earth, according to a Nobel-prize winning economist.

Sir Angus Deaton is leading a landmark review of inequality in the UK amid fears that the country is at a tipping point due to a decade of stagnant pay growth for British workers. The Institute for Fiscal Studies thinktank, which is working with Deaton on the study, said the British-born economist would “point to the risk of the UK following the US” which has extreme inequality levels in pay, wealth and health.

via Britain risks heading to US levels of inequality, warns top economist | Inequality | The Guardian

Cinzia Arruzza on How Women Are Leading the Class Struggle

Meanwhile, teachers in Las Vegas are voting this week on whether to join the nationwide strike wave, which has largely been led by educators. Hundreds of thousands of public school teachers and education workers struck last year, the overwhelming majority without the protection of traditional collective bargaining rights. So did thousands of nurses and hotel workers. Outside of the workplace, migrant women traveling with a caravan launched a hunger strike in Tijuana to protest delays in the asylum process; Irish women overturned that country’s abortion ban; and Spanish women led the resistance to the rise of the far right.

via Cinzia Arruzza on How Women Are Leading the Class Struggle

Domestic abuse: PM vows to end ‘postcode lottery’ for victims – BBC News

Councils in England will have a legal duty to provide secure homes for victims of domestic abuse under new plans announced by Theresa May.
People seeking refuge from abuse and violence can receive varying levels of support depending on their location.
But Mrs May has vowed to end the “postcode lottery” for victims and their children, creating a legal duty for councils to provide refuge.
One victim described the move as “absolutely momentous” news.

via Domestic abuse: PM vows to end ‘postcode lottery’ for victims – BBC News

Senator Introduces Do Not Track Bill to Block Companies From Collecting Your Data

A new bill is trying to create a program similar to The Do Not Call list, except it would stop companies from tracking your online activities.

Senator Josh Hawley, Republican of Missouri, announced on Monday he is introducing the Do Not Track Act. If approved, the bill would allow people to block companies from collecting data on their activity “beyond what is indispensable” for whatever services the company provides online.b

In 2009, internet activists first introduced the idea of putting “Do Not Track” message in HTTP headers, alerting companies that the user denies permission to track activity. The next year the Federal Trade Commission supported a Do Not Track program. But even though millions of people use Do Not Track—it doesn’t do anything, because there are no fines for breaking a Do Not Track request.

via Senator Introduces Do Not Track Bill to Block Companies From Collecting Your Data