Domestic abuse report exposes hidden side of rural life – BBC News

Domestic abuse victims there suffer for longer, are less likely to report abuse and struggle to get support, it said.
Victims are isolated, unsupported and unprotected in a “rural hell” that protects the perpetrators, the National Rural Crime Network report found.

via Domestic abuse report exposes hidden side of rural life – BBC News

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Leah Chase, Iconic Chef and Civil Rights Activist, Dies at 96

Leah Chase, iconic executive chef, civil rights activist, and co-owner of the legendary Dooky Chase’s Restaurant in New Orleans, died Saturday. She was 96 years old.

“Her daily joy was not simply cooking, but preparing meals to bring people together,” Chase’s family said in a written statement. “One of her most prized contributions was advocating for the Civil Rights Movement through feeding those on the front lines of the struggle for human dignity. She saw her role and that of Dooky Chase’s Restaurant to serve as a vehicle for social change during a difficult time in our country’s history.”

via Leah Chase, Iconic Chef and Civil Rights Activist, Dies at 96

YouTube Just Can’t Stop Mumbling Nonsense About Its Harassment and Hate Speech Policy

YouTube has not had an easy go of it over the last 24 hours. Right in the middle of LGBT Pride Month, the platform responded to Vox Media host Carlos Maza’s claims that right-wing YouTube host Steven Crowder had repeatedly taunted him with racist, homophobic language including “lispy queer,” “token Vox gay atheist sprite,” “gay Mexican,” and “anchor baby” by… ruling that Crowder was not, in fact, in completely obvious violation of its anti-hate speech rules.

via YouTube Just Can’t Stop Mumbling Nonsense About Its Harassment and Hate Speech Policy

Britain risks heading to US levels of inequality, warns top economist | Inequality | The Guardian

Rising inequality in Britain risks putting the country on the same path as the US to become one of the most unequal nations on earth, according to a Nobel-prize winning economist.

Sir Angus Deaton is leading a landmark review of inequality in the UK amid fears that the country is at a tipping point due to a decade of stagnant pay growth for British workers. The Institute for Fiscal Studies thinktank, which is working with Deaton on the study, said the British-born economist would “point to the risk of the UK following the US” which has extreme inequality levels in pay, wealth and health.

via Britain risks heading to US levels of inequality, warns top economist | Inequality | The Guardian

Domestic abuse: PM vows to end ‘postcode lottery’ for victims – BBC News

Councils in England will have a legal duty to provide secure homes for victims of domestic abuse under new plans announced by Theresa May.
People seeking refuge from abuse and violence can receive varying levels of support depending on their location.
But Mrs May has vowed to end the “postcode lottery” for victims and their children, creating a legal duty for councils to provide refuge.
One victim described the move as “absolutely momentous” news.

via Domestic abuse: PM vows to end ‘postcode lottery’ for victims – BBC News

Senator Introduces Do Not Track Bill to Block Companies From Collecting Your Data

A new bill is trying to create a program similar to The Do Not Call list, except it would stop companies from tracking your online activities.

Senator Josh Hawley, Republican of Missouri, announced on Monday he is introducing the Do Not Track Act. If approved, the bill would allow people to block companies from collecting data on their activity “beyond what is indispensable” for whatever services the company provides online.b

In 2009, internet activists first introduced the idea of putting “Do Not Track” message in HTTP headers, alerting companies that the user denies permission to track activity. The next year the Federal Trade Commission supported a Do Not Track program. But even though millions of people use Do Not Track—it doesn’t do anything, because there are no fines for breaking a Do Not Track request.

via Senator Introduces Do Not Track Bill to Block Companies From Collecting Your Data

How the Healthcare System Fails People Who Don't Speak English

When Samia Ali worked as a medical scribe in Rhode Island—assisting doctors by writing down what happened during patient visits—she saw everything there is to see about the intimacies of a patient-physician relationship.

Many times, Ali told Splinter in an interview, she saw efficient and thoughtful care. But there was also neglect, mismanagement and, in some cases, open xenophobia.

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“One dynamic that struck me was working with providers who did two things: express impatience when [patients were] not understanding English and [ignore] that most elder immigrants like bringing another person, usually one of their kids, to talk to the provider directly as a translator,” she said.

via How the Healthcare System Fails People Who Don't Speak English

Mississippi State Rep Doug McLeod Allegedly Punched His Wife in the Face for Undressing Slowly

McLeod, per the incident report, was so drunk that he “had slurred speech and walked slow in a zigzag pattern.” When deputies went into the McLeod’s bedroom, they found blood on the bed and on the floor. Per the Sun Herald, his wife told deputies that “her husband was drunk and ‘just snapped,’ as he often does when under the influence of alcohol.”

Another woman who lives at the McLeod home, presumably a family member, told the sheriff’s department that McLeod’s wife ran up to her room, and shut and locked the door:

via Mississippi State Rep Doug McLeod Allegedly Punched His Wife in the Face for Undressing Slowly

Poly Parents Are Losing Custody of Their Kids In Brutal Divorce Battles – MEL Magazine

Naomi had been married to her husband David for 15 years when he asked her if she was open to trying polyamory. After some hesitation, she agreed, and the two joined a lifestyle group called True Friends and Lovers in Alexandria, Virginia, in the D.C. area. Although neither had actually slept with another person outside the marriage yet, Naomi, a preschool owner, found that joining the group was a completely transformative experience. “Here I was being exposed to this whole lifestyle,” she recalls, “and I felt like I had probably [wanted to be] polyamorous my whole life.”
Eventually, Naomi (a pseudonym) befriended Eric, a man within the community who lived with his wife and an additional female partner. After a few months, Naomi began seeing Eric romantically. It was around that point that David started to become uncomfortable with her involvement with the poly community, despite the fact that he had also been intimate with other women in the community. “He’d be fine for a couple days, and then he’d say, ‘This isn’t how I wanna live my life,’” Naomi says. “Then he’d ask, ‘When’s the next party?’”

via Poly Parents Are Losing Custody of Their Kids In Brutal Divorce Battles – MEL Magazine

The Racist Roots of Denying Incarcerated People Their Right to Vote | American Civil Liberties Union

In the 15 years between 1865 and 1880, at least 13 states — more than a third of the country’s 38 states — enacted broad felony disenfranchisement laws. The theory was simple — convict them of crimes, strip away the right to vote, imprison them, and lease them out as convict labor and Blacks would be returned to a condition as close to slavery as possible.

No one tried to hide the intent of these laws.

In 1894, a white South Carolina newspaper argued that amendments to the voting laws were necessary to avoid whites being swept away at the polls by the Black vote. In 1901, Alabama amended its Constitution to expand disenfranchisement to all crimes involving “moral turpitude” — a vague term that was applied to felonies and misdemeanors. The president of that constitutional convention argued that manipulating the ballot to exclude Blacks was justified because of the need to avoid the “menace of Negro domination,” especially since Blacks were inferior to whites.

via The Racist Roots of Denying Incarcerated People Their Right to Vote | American Civil Liberties Union